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4 edition of Passive measurement and interpretation of polarized microwave brightness temperatures found in the catalog.

Passive measurement and interpretation of polarized microwave brightness temperatures

Passive measurement and interpretation of polarized microwave brightness temperatures

annual status report #1 for grant NAGW 4191 : covering the period from August 1, 1994 to July 31, 1995

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Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Technical Information Service, distributor in [Washington, D.C, Springfield, Va .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementA.J. Gasiewski, D.B. Kunkee, J.R. Piepmeier.
Series[NASA contractor report] -- NASA CR-199288., NASA contractor report -- NASA CR-199288.
ContributionsKunkee, D. B., Piepmeier, J. R., United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17793455M
OCLC/WorldCa34743907

Passive microwave remote sensors onboard satellites provide an all-weather global SWE observation capability day or night. Brightness temperatures from different channels of satellite passive microwave sensors (hereafter referred to as PM) can be used to estimate the snow water equivalent (or snow depth. LI et al.: WINDSAT PASSIVE MICROWAVE POLARIMETRIC SIGNATURES OF THE GREENLAND ICE SHEET Fig. 1. Composite WindSat polarimetric measurements at GHz for the four Stokes parameters collected by WindSat during February 1–10,

ground based microwave measurements, Matzler () showed that horizontally polarized brightness temperatures at 19 and 37 GHz are slightly more sensitive to snowpack stratigraphy than the vertically polarized brightness temper-atures. For spaceborne passive microwave observations over large footprints, however, Rango et al. () demonstrated.   Data Description Parameters. The main output of this data set is cm surface soil moisture (cm 3 /cm 3) presented on the global 36 km EASE-Grid Also included are Brightness Temperature (T b) measurements (K), representing the weighted average of SMAP Level-1B brightness temperatures whose boresights fall within each 36 km EASE-Grid grid cell.

  The vertically polarized 37 GHz channel (37V) of the Special Sensor Microwave Imager and Sounder (SSMIS) on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F satellite that provides passive microwave brightness temperatures is providing spurious data. passive microwave signatures of sea surfaces.T)leoretical azimuthal modulations are found to agree well with experimental observationsfoI all Stokesparanle- tcrs fromnear- nadir to 65° incidence up/downwind asymmetries of brightness temperatures are .


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Passive measurement and interpretation of polarized microwave brightness temperatures Download PDF EPUB FB2

Correlator equipment (illustrated schematically in Fig. 1) was trained on the polarized calibration load described by Gasiewski and Kunkee [].

Rotation of the polarized load resulted in brightness temperature variations in all three measured Stokes* parameters TA, TB, and T0. The data represent.

The project focuses on the development of polarimetric microwave radiometers using digital cross-correlators for obtaining precise measurements of all four Stokes' parameters.

As part of the project a unique four-band polarimetric imaging radiometer, the Polar Scanning Radiometer (PSR), is being designed for use on the NASA DC-8 aircraft. Get this from a library. Passive measurement and interpretation of polarized microwave brightness temperatures: annual status report #1 for grant NAGW covering the period from August 1, to J [Albin J Gasiewski; D B Kunkee; J R Piepmeier; United States.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration.]. AIREX: Passive measurement and interpretation of polarized microwave brightness temperatures The goal of this project is to develop satellite-based observational techniques for measuring both oceanic and atmospheric variables using passive polarimetric radiometry.

Hourly L-band ( GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (TB's) measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the corn growth cycle are analyzed. These TB measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth Author: A.

Joseph, R. van der Velde, P. O'Neill, E. Kim, R. Lang, T. Gish. Satellite-borne passive microwave radiometers record brightness temperature depressions due to the scattering of upwelling radiation by large ice hydrometeors (graupel, hail).

Spencer et al. (, ) and Spencer and Santek () examined satellite measurements of GHz brightness temperature as an indicator of intense convection and severe by: Observation-driven and single-pass estimation of active-passive microwave covariation.

The microwave covariation parameter β is retrieved as the ratio of emission and backscatter after each measurement is corrected for direct vegetation contribution as shown in. The correction terms ((f V + e V), |S PP V | 2) are defined in.Cited by: 5.

PASSIVE REMOTE SENSING AT MICROWAVE WAVELENGTH David H. Staelin antenna from any given direction can be described by an equivalent brightness temperature, TB (v, 0, 0) (OK).

The antenna temperature is then an average of the brightness tem- direct measurement of antenna temperatures near 5-mm wavelength. Such measure. The model calculations are compared to the measured angular variations of the polarized brightness temperatures at both L-band ( GHz) and C-band (5 GHz) frequencies.

Brightness temperature The main parameter of interest being measured in microwave radiometry is the radiometric temperature or brightness temperature of the source. The brightness temperature of an object is the temperature of a blackbody with the same brightness. In the table, TT 2m refers to screen-level temperature, TD 2m to screen-level dewpoint temperature, and TB to the SMAP horizontal polarized brightness temperatures.

For the analyzed variables, w i refers to the soil moisture for layer i, while TBG i and TVG i refer to the bare ground and vegetation surface temperatures for the force–restore Cited by: 1.

[1] We present a method for detecting rain‐contaminated wind vector cells in QuikSCAT SeaWinds scatterometer observations. This rain detection method uses passive measurements of microwave brightness temperature obtained as a signal processing by‐product from the standard SeaWinds active scatterometer by: 8.

Abstract: Vertically polarized, and GHz brightness temperatures from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) are examined for the Augustperiod when data from both sensors are available in the Equal-Area Scalable Earth Grid (EASE-Grid) projection.

Colocated measurements over terrestrial surfaces of Cited by:   The DPR algorithm is developed using vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures at the same channel of GHz. It depends on the ratio of dual-polarized emissivity, α, which is determined empirically at about by remotely sensed brightness temperature in winter and used for the other seasons as by: 7.

An updated analysis of the ocean surface wind direction signal in passive microwave brightness temperatures Abstract: We analyze the wind direction signal for vertically (v) and horizontally (h) polarized microwave radiation at 37 GHz, 19 GHz, and 11 GHz; and an Earth incidence angle of 53/spl deg/.Cited by: Cloud Scattering Signal Observed from Satellites: a Study Using TRMM Microwave Passive and Active Measurements V.S.

Galligani1, C. Prigent1, E. Defer1, C. Jimenez1 and P. Eriksson2 Abstract. Concurrent passive and active microwave measurements onboard the Tropical Rain-fall Measurement Mission (TRMM) show that under cloudy conditions, when a melt.

Thus, the brightness temperature of an emitter of microwave radiation is related to the physical temperature of the source through the emissivity such that (1) where R is the smooth surface reflectivity, T sfc is the thermometric temperature of the soil surface, and e=(1-R) is the emissivity, which depends on the dielectric constant of the.

X = cm vertically polarized microwave brightness temperature FIGURE 7. Nimbus-6 microwave brightness temperatures for the Canadian, U.S., and Bl,~-~iun study areas versus snow by: [1] Analysis of passive microwave satellite observations over the Greenland ice sheet reveals a significant increase in surface melt over the period – Sincethe total melt area was found to have increased by + × 10 7 km improved version of the cross‐polarized gradient ratio (XPGR) technique is used to identify the melt from the brightness by: [1] Concurrent passive and active microwave measurements onboard the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) show that under cloudy conditions, when a melting layer is detected by the precipitation radar, a polarized scattering signal at 85 GHz in passive mode is often observed.

Radiative transfer simulations confirm the. Request PDF | High-resolution passive polarimetric microwave mapping of ocean surface wind vector fields | The retrieval of ocean surface wind fields in both one and two dimensions is demonstrated.3 48 absorption by liquid rain drops and water vapor and scattering by ice particles.

Vertically and 49 horizontally polarized radiances are measured at various frequencies between 5 and GHz 50 and converted into brightness temperatures (TBs) for physical interpretation. The physical 51 principles of the radiative transfer of microwaves in the atmosphere are well understood and.

The Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI), defined as the difference between the 37 GHz vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (TBs) measured by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/lmager (SSM/I), often is used for vegetation monitoring.

However, variability in soil moisture can confound its : Gerald W. Felde.